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Devil's Postpile National Monument, Reds Meado...
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If you happen to be in the Mammoth area, try a hike to Devils Postpile. The hike to this great columnar basalt formation is great for families and if you keep going, you’ll hit Rainbow Falls. Here are some articles on visiting Devils Postpile.

Hiking the Devil’s Postpile | Modern Hiker

An under 6-mile trail in Devil’s Postpile National Monument. This is spectacular Sierra scenery all around, with the Wild and Scenic San Joaquin River, several waterfalls, and the Postpile itself – an exquisite example of columnnar …

Publish Date: 06/08/2010 10:43

http://www.modernhiker.com/2010/06/08/hiking-the-devils-postpile/

Devils Postpile National Monument (California)

Established in 1911 by presidential proclamation, Devils Postpile National Monument protects and preserves the Devils Postpile formation, the 101-foot Rainbow Falls, and the pristine mountain scenery. The Devils Postpile formation is a …

Publish Date: 07/06/2010 9:09

http://newmexiken.com/2010/07/devils-postpile-national-monument-california/

The Devil Postpile National Monument (1952) by Richard J

Devils Postpile National Monument geology, map, and administration. Written by Richard J. Hartesveldt, 1952.

Publish Date: 05/06/2007 21:48

http://www.yosemite.ca.us/library/devil_postpile/

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Bristlecone pine in Great Basin National Park

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One of my favorite places to visit is Bristlecone Pine Forest. Hiking through the oldest living beings, you get a sense of wonder and awe as to how these trees manage to live in conditions that seem to defy life. Unfortunately, a few trees were burned during a fire a few years ago, which goes to show that even these ancient trees are not immortal.  So if you have a chance, take a day to explore Bristlecone Pine Forest for yourself and get a look at the oldest living tree, Methuselah.

The Bristelcone Pine Forests In Big Pine California – Absolutely

The Bristlecone Pine Forest in Big Pine, California is one of the most amazing sights you will ever see. When you visit you’ll be in the presence of what are likely to be the oldest living things on earth. While they are not anywhere …

Publish Date: 07/22/2010 14:42

http://www.skianything.com/2010/07/the-bristelcone-pine-forests-in-big-pine-california-absolutely-stunning-sights/

Olive Ike King: Methuselah Trail, Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest

Turn left on the White Mountain Road, which is clearly signed to the Bristlecone Pine Forest. Follow this paved road 10 miles until you find the turn off and parking lot to the Schulman Grove Visitor Center. Park here. …

Publish Date: 06/15/2010 13:42

http://www.oliveikeking.com/2010/06/methuselah-trail-ancient-bristlecone.html

California Destination Guide: Ancient Bristlecone Pine Forest

Bristlecone Pine Forest Visitor Center Drive up to the 10000 foot level of the white mountains of in east central California and you will find the earth’s oldest living inhabitant “Methuselah”, at 4767 year old Bristlecone Pine. …

Publish Date: 02/22/2008 6:35

http://californiadaytrips.blogspot.com/2008/02/ancient-bristlecone-pine-forest.html

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September 7 is only 13 days away. So, what’s so significant about September 7? Well, it’s Labor Day.

So what? Labor Day comes every year.

You see, this year it’s different. Labor Day, 2009, is the date shortly after which the state of California proposes to close about 100 of its state parks.

Many interest groups and philanthropic agencies are trying to raise the money to keep these parks open.

If you live in California, write your state legislative representative, and tell him or her that the state parks are vital to our well-being and must not be closed.

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